Polyamory? Is it possible to love more than one person?

AgnosticBoy

Agnostic, Independent (politically)
Staff member
Oct 1, 2020
189
16
TheAgnosticForum.com
Today we find that most cultures practice monogamy when it comes to romantic relationships. This has not always been the case the further back in history you go. Despite our predominantly monogamous values, there are some that practice polyamory/polygamy and perhaps many more that are curious about it. It would seem that it would have to be possible to love more than one person in order for these relationships to work. Let's debate this.

For Debate:
1. Is it possible to be in love with more than one person at the same time?
2. If you're married, and start to become attracted to someone else, does that always have to mean you don't love first partner/spouse? (I assume that this would be a natural way for a polyamorous relationship to come about)
 

TracyRN

Catholic
Oct 25, 2020
20
6
Florida
forums.catholic.com
My short answer is a definite no & no. It is selfish to think that you can love more than one person without thinking about how your partners will feel about it. Do you think the two women would enjoy knowing that you are sleeping with both of them while claiming to love them? This would lead to jealousy and no woman would put up with that. Only the guy would enjoy it. It is immoral, unfair, and sickening to say the least.
 

AgnosticBoy

Agnostic, Independent (politically)
Staff member
Oct 1, 2020
189
16
TheAgnosticForum.com
My short answer is a definite no & no.
I agree with your response if the only reason behind the poly relationship was the guy and all of his interests. Where you and I might disagree is that I am open to considering that there are polyamorous relationships that involve the interests of everyone involved. I would imagine that one key basic is that everyone is honest and consents to such relationship. Secondly, there would have to be not only dyadic marital roles (roles between two people, like one on one time, dating, communication, etc) but there would also have to be communal marital roles, as well. Those latter roles would involve things that all 3 or more partners can do together to strengthen the relationship, like all of them talking or contributing to improving romance, finances, child rearing, making dinner, etc. These communal aspects that I bring up probably wouldn't be thought of in a modern Western culture (unless the married couple lives with others), but nonetheless I think that's where the "other" person or partners could find their interests fulfilled.